Short, sharp and immediately useful does Blockchain for AFTRS

By January 30, 2020Bitcoin Business
Click here to view original web page at www.artshub.com.au

AFTRS launches a new initiative of tailored seminars to deal with fast-moving areas of knowledge.

Short, sharp and immediately useful does Blockchain for AFTRS

Caught between symbolic and real, prison and liberation, Blockchain is at least another technology to understand. Image: Piqsels.

In response to the skills survey by AFTRS in 2019, the school has created a monthly series of presentations which will be backed by intense preparation and designed to empower participants with valuable learning.

The first one, on Thursday 27 February from 2-5.30pm, looks like a flagship launch. It will attempt to untangle the implications of blockchain for the creative industries. Blockchain is a word which makes grown accountants and industry intellectuals back slowly out the door. It is caught up with the language of bitcoin and disruptive technologies. Two RMIT academics Ellie Rennie and Jason Potts have risked their sanity to write what they call a provocation paper called Blockchain and the Creative Industries.

According to the release, the paper:

'brings together current thinking around the use of blockchain technology, and concludes that the creative industries stand to benefit greatly from this new economic infrastructure – possibly more than any other segment of the economy.

'Rennie and Potts will explain how creative industries are experimenting with distributed ledger technology, or blockchain, for royalty payments for music and screen works, proving the authenticity of visual artworks and fashion, avoiding ticket scalping and more. Their paper says that for creative practitioners, this means simpler and more transparent transactions, easier contracting, fewer overheads and less reliance on middlemen and that streamlined processes for collaboration between creative practitioners might also emerge.

'On the last Thursday afternoon of every month throughout 2020 at AFTRS with each seminar tailored for the creative industries, informed by our industry intel and addressing current needs and trends. The wide variety of topics will include project financing, social media as part of a business strategy, developing brands, managing creative teams, deals and rights negotiations and developing IP and emerging technology.

'The seminar will also present real-world case studies from companies that have successfully integrated blockchain into their business models and includes a discussion with a panel of industry stakeholders as to where blockchain may add value to Australian creatives.'

There will be case studies.

In the second half you will hear about real-world case studies from companies that are using blockchain, including FilmChain, and be part of a discussion with a panel of industry stakeholders – including Emma Madison from Screenrights – as to where it may go in Australia.

These seminars are not entirely cheap at $162 early bird, but they are most likely to attract specific audiences to specific programs where the information makes an obvious difference. The list goes on to include 'project financing, social media as part of a business strategy, developing brands, managing creative teams, deals and rights negotiations and developing IP and emerging technology.'

Screen Australia is also involved along with the Australia Council for the Arts; we think they will appeal to a diverse audience that goes far beyond the usual screen community.

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